HOT DOGS

by nuclearhistory

Great moments in the history of Hormesis

Hematological effects of inhaled plutonium dioxide in beagles.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7597146

Quote
Hematological effects of inhaled plutonium dioxide in beagles.

Weller RE, Buschbom RL, Park JF, Dagle GE, Ragan HA.
Source
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA.

Cumulative dose and dose rate appeared to act together to produce initial effects on lymphocyte populations, while dose rate alone appeared to be responsible for the maintenance and subsequent cycles of lymphopenia seen over the life span. No primary tumors were associated with the thoracic lymph nodes in this study, although 70% of the lymphopenic dogs developed lung tumors.”
end quote. Very short quote from abstract. See original site.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6469650

Quote

Health Phys. 1984 Jul;47(1):73-84.
Plutonium-induced wounds in beagles.
Dagle GE, Bristline RW, Lebel JL, Watters RL.

Abstract

Beagle dogs were given subcutaneous implants of plutonium in their forepaws to mimic hand wounds received by workers accidentally contaminated with plutonium…….The injected paws sequestered 21 and 16%, respectively, of the injected activity from plutonium oxide and plutonium nitrate in hypocellular scar tissue. The highest concentrations of translocated radionuclides were found in the regional lymph nodes. ….. Osteosarcomas and hepatomas were present in one dog injected with plutonium oxide. There does not appear to be any unique risk for dogs related to the subcutaneous route of exposure to plutonium.
end quote. Brief quote from abstract.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1120671

Health Phys. 1975 Apr;28(4):395-8.
Translocation kinetics of plutonium oxide from the popliteal lymph nodes of beagles.
Dagle GE, Lebel JL, Phemister RD, Watters RL, Gomez LS.

http://www.jstor.org/pss/3574042

Plutonium-Induced Popliteal Lymphadenitis in Beagles1
by GE Dagle – 1975

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NwwAAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA29&lpg=PA29&dq=beagles+plutonium+lymph&source=bl&ots=XrNYkor5Um&sig=fSIukyzRMS8Sujf4C4s3GnN9kOw&hl=en&ei=WD6wTfHzF4OvrAez0OSJCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CEAQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=beagles%20plutonium%20lymph&f=false

google book
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists – Sep 1976 – Google Books Result
48 pages – Magazine
The most extensive studies of inhaled plutonium have been on beagles at Battelle’s … 40 percent was in the thoracic lymph nodes, 15 percent in liver, …

[PDF]
COMPARATIVE DISPOSITION OF FOUR TYPES OF PLUTONIUM DIOXIDES …
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – Quick View
by WJ BAIR
www.irpa.net/irpa1/cdrom/VOL.1/R1_28.PDF
COMPARATIVE DISPOSITION OF FOUR TYPES OF
PLUTONIUM DIOXIDES INHALED BY DOGS *
W. J. BAIR and J. F. PARK
Biology Department, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Battelle Memorial Institute,
Richland, Washington, U.S.A.
Abstract-Groups of three dogs were given single inhalation exposures to dry aerosols of one
of four different plutonium dioxides to compare retention, translocation, and rates of excretion.
The lung retention half-time of the oxalate calcined at 350C was about one year, half that of the other oxides. This was due to greater accumulation of plutonium in the bronchial lymph nodes rather than greater clearance via the mucus-ciliary
pathway or a relatively high rate of solubility. The metal oxidized at 450C was cleared via the
mucus-ciliary route to a lesser extent than the other oxides. This same oxide also showed a
selective loss of Am 241, relative to Pu239, in lung and bronchial lymph node tissue which was
not evidenced by the other oxides. The oxalate calcined at 1000C showed the least translocation
to tissues outside the respiratory tract. These results indicate that the physical-chemical state
of inhaled plutonium dioxide influences its disposition in the body.
end quote of partial abstract.

No sign of radiation hormesis there. Indications of individual responses to the trial conditions.

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